Tag: SOP

Why use the “buddy system” during Line Openings?

Most LEO (Line & Equipment Opening) policy a.k.a. “Line Break” policies require a second person away from the work but in the immediate area. It is reasonable to ask why the procedure demands this.

Put as simply as possible:

  1. PSM/RMP and IIAR 7 require procedures for Line & Equipment Openings. (or IIAR 7 alone if you have under 10k pounds)
  2. The PHA asks questions that identify hazards which result in administrative controls aka procedures. Those procedures will have to control the unique hazards identified in the PHA.
  3. RAGAGEP for procedures (such as IIAR 7) require the buddy system be addressed in Line & Equipment Opening procedures.
  4. HazMat & Firefighting history show it is useful.
  5. Human Nature tells us that people tend to hold each other accountable.

 

Let’s work through this step-by-step

1. PSM/RMP requires us to have a procedure:

1910.119(f)(4) The employer shall develop and implement safe work practices to provide for the control of hazards during operations such as lockout/tagout; confined space entry; opening process equipment or piping; and control over entrance into a facility by maintenance, contractor, laboratory, or other support personnel. These safe work practices shall apply to employees and contractor employees.

Put another way: We have to develop a written procedure on Line & Equipment Openings which everyone must follow.

 

2. Hazards identified during a PHA are often controlled with Administrative controls, such as SOPs. SOP content therefore must address the hazards identified in the PHA. Some examples:

…the Ammonia exposure increases while the operator is using an APR/SCBA? (II.8) This is what makes us mandate the use of a personal NH3 detector during line openings and leak investigations.

…there is inadequate isolation prior to maintenance? (HF.3) …the Ammonia pump-out for a length of piping or for a piece of equipment is incomplete? (PO.1) This is why SOPs include a pressure check to confirm pumpdown. This is also why the LEO procedure (and permit) require a written SOP & permit to check the effectiveness of the procedure.

…an injured worker is unable to summon assistance? (HF.56) This (among other reasons) is why we require a Buddy System. The LEO policy, in the General Precautions section, states “A buddy-system is used for all LEO procedures. The second person must be trained to initiate emergency action and must be stationed close enough to observe the activity but far enough away to ensure that they would not be endangered by an accidental release.”

 

3. The RAGAGEP for procedures IIAR 7-2019 has this requirement:

4.4.2 Buddy System. Operating procedures shall indicate when the buddy system shall be practiced in performing work on the ammonia refrigeration system

A4.4.2-The buddy system should be practiced for operations where there is the potential that ammonia could be released, for example, operations which involve opening ammonia refrigeration equipment or piping. The buddy system should also be practiced during emergency operations involving ammonia releases.

 

4. HazMat & Firefighting history: Hazardous Materials teams and Firefighters have long used a 2-person team for increased safety. To some degree, this is enshrined in OSHA rules in 1910.134(g)(3)…

1910.134(g)(3) Procedures for IDLH atmospheres. For all IDLH atmospheres, the employer shall ensure that:

1910.134(g)(3)(i) One employee or, when needed, more than one employee is located outside the IDLH atmosphere;

1910.134(g)(3)(ii) Visual, voice, or signal line communication is maintained between the employee(s) in the IDLH atmosphere and the employee(s) located outside the IDLH atmosphere;

While we don’t INTEND to work inside a IDLH atmosphere during a LEO procedure, the possibility certainly exists if something goes wrong. The “buddy system” allows the person performing the LEO to focus on the work while the second person remains in the area situationally aware and ready to respond in the event that the situation changes or something goes wrong.

 

5. Human Nature: The LEO policy is written around accountability. The policy requires that we demonstrate to a second person that we’ve followed the policy and adequately prepared for the work before the LEO occurs.  The “buddy system” tends to keep the actions “in-line” during the actual work.

Note: While it’s certainly possible  – from a regulatory view – that you could have certain specific LEO procedures that did not require a “buddy,” you would have to be able to document how you managed to address all of the issues outlined above without the second person.

Thanks to Bryan Haywood of SaftEng.net and Gary Smith of ASTI (Ammonia Safety Training Institute) for their time and thoughts in helping review this post.

Dealing with non-standard (non-routine) work in your Process Safety program

Occasionally we come across an issue we’ve customarily addressed, but never documented. Put another way: We realize we have a policy – even if an informal one – on how to deal with certain situations, but we’ve never turned that policy into a formal, written one.

It’s incredibly common to have these informal policies in smaller departments, or when a task is rare. You can usually identify them after-the-fact when you are told “That’s just the way we do things here. Everybody knows that.”

When we find these items in our Covered Processes, we should endeavor to document them. Today I’d like to talk about a big one: What do we do when the existing written procedures don’t match with the conditions or situations we are facing in our work. What written guidance are you providing to your Process Operators and Technicians on how to deal with this situation?

Every functioning Operations / Maintenance department has a policy – even if an informal, undocumented one – on how they deal with this issue.  

For years I’ve relied on the text in the SOP Written Plan concerning Temporary Operations:

The ammonia system is not operated in any temporary modes without a written SOP. If a component requires maintenance or replacement, that portion of the system is isolated and removed from service through a written SOP. Other Temporary Operations are handled through the MOC element which will ensure supervisory oversight. Temporary Operation SOPs are often via a written modification of an existing SOP in the form of an addendum.

This worked well, but it was a little bit obscure and (understandably) only thought to apply to SOPs themselves. That needed to change. What we’ve done to our system today, is formalized and documented guidance on how to deal with these non-standard / non-routine situations.

A new policy was placed in the RMP Management System Written Plan…

To ensure integration of this policy, the following text was added to the Operating Procedures (Implementation Policy: Using an SOP – Performing a Procedure, and Implementation Policy: Operating Phases, Temporary Operations) and Mechanical Integrity (Implementation Policy: Mechanical Integrity Procedures or MIPs) element Written Plans: “The Implementation Policy: Non-Standard Work. Addressing Conditions / Situations outside of existing Procedures found in the RMP Written Plan should be used when site/equipment/system Conditions or Situations are found to be different than those anticipated in the exiting written procedures.”

Are you handling non-standard / non-routine work well in your Process Safety program? If you are, and have a better idea, we’re always open to improvements. If you aren’t handling it well, perhaps you can implement the example above? 


For Inside-Baseball type people: This chart was inspired by the API RECOMMENDED PRACTICE 2201 Safe Hot Tapping Practices in the Petroleum and Petrochemical Industries, Chapter 4, Section 4.3.1, Figure 3—Example Decision Process for Authorizing Hot Tapping. Other than genericizing that flowchart to cover all types of work, I also made two large changes:

  • Routed the post “change conditions” step back to the start so we re-evaluate the existing procedure considering changed conditions/situations rather than short-circuiting back to the Management step.
  • Rewrote the flow/wording so that Condition Changes are preferred over mere procedural changes. The thinking was that we should prefer more engineering-type changes over administrative ones, where possible.

 

IIAR 7-2019 Update

It’s been coming for a while now and yesterday it became official:

Introducing: ANSI/IIAR 7-2019Developing Operating Procedures for Closed-Circuit Ammonia Refrigeration Systems

In 2013, the first issue of IIAR 7 replaced the operations information contained in IIAR Bulletin No. 110, Guidelines for Start-Up, Inspection, and Maintenance of Ammonia Mechanical Refrigerating Systems.

This standard was first approved as an American National Standard by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) in August 2013. ANSI requires reaffirmation or revision for periodic maintenance requirements of existing standards every five years. Work began on periodic maintenance of this standard in February 2017 and was completed in April 2019.

This standard defines the minimum requirements for developing operating procedures for closed-circuit ammonia refrigeration systems. Informative Appendix A was added to provide explanatory information related to provisions in the standard.

 

A little over two years ago, the SOP templates were updated to include all the requirements of IIAR 7 2013. That was a pretty large undertaking, but if you already made those changes, it looks like you are in good shape! I’ve reviewed the new IIAR 7 and it turns out we only need to make one substantive change to programs using the current templates.

 

What’s the requirement / change? 

The 2013 version required a visual inspection of hoses when they were used. This was a pretty minor requirement. The newer version requires that procedures include “Steps to inspect hoses and fittings visually to make sure they are suitable for ammonia refrigeration service”  whenever you Transfer (such as in pump-down) or Charge ammonia. To address this issue, I’ve modified the ROSOP-LEO and Permit form to include an explicit check and a reference to the “ITPMR-AHT-365 – Ammonia Transfer Hose Annual ITPM Record” we recently added due to IIAR 6.

So, if you’ve already updated your system for IIAR 6 compliance, then all you need to do is update your LEO procedure and Permit. If you haven’t updated your system for IIAR 6 compliance, then you need to integrate the new ITPMR as well as make plans to address the entirety of IIAR 6.

Note: Overall the 2019 IIAR 7 is much simpler than the 2013  version. It’s moved a lot of stuff to informative appendices which removes most of my complaints about it. Unfortunately they renumbered* just about every single requirement in the standard. This meant I had to completely renumber / rewrite my standalone SOP audit template. The good news is that the IIAR7-2019 version of that audit was reduced from 110 pages to 87. Of those remaining 87 pages of questions, 60 pages are due to IIAR 7.

* This was not an attempt to drive me closer to insanity, but an attempt to harmonize numbering systems between all the IIAR standards. I know this because I actually asked the IIAR about this. Thankfully, Tony Lundell has a good sense of humor.

One Hazard, Multiple Attempts at Control

Given the catastrophic nature of the hazards associated with PSM, the interrelationship of the PSM elements work together as a safety net to help ensure that if the employer is deficient in one PSM element, the other elements if complied with would assist in preventing or mitigating a catastrophic incident. Consequently, the PSM standard requires the use of a one hazard-several abatement approach to ensure that PSM-related hazards are adequately controlled. (OSHA, CPL 2-2.45A, 1994)

 

The text above, from OSHA’s old PQV (Program Quality Verification) audit is critical to understanding a key concept of successful Process Safety: The more ways you attempt to control a hazard, the more likely you are to be successful.

Sometimes this concept is referred to as the “Swiss Cheese Model.” I’ll quote from Wikipedia:

It likens human systems to multiple slices of swiss cheese, stacked side by side, in which the risk of a threat becoming a reality is mitigated by the differing layers and types of defenses which are “layered” behind each other. Therefore, in theory, lapses and weaknesses in one defense do not allow a risk to materialize, since other defenses also exist, to prevent a single point of failure. The model was originally formally propounded by Dante Orlandella and James T. Reason of the University of Manchester, and has since gained widespread acceptance. It is sometimes called the cumulative act effect.

To understand how this works in a functioning program, I want to point out how we recently addressed a single hazard in our program to show how many different ways we attempted to control it.

 

The hazard

 In IIAR’s upcoming standard 6 “Standard for Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Closed-Circuit Ammonia Refrigeration Systems” a hazard is identified and a prohibition is put in place to address that hazard:

 

5.6.3.4 Hot work such as the use of matches, lighters, sulfur sticks, torches, welding equipment, and similar portable devices shall be permitted except when charging is being performed and when oil or ammonia is being removed from the system.

 

The IIAR is recognizing that there is an increased likelihood of an Ammonia / Oil fire during charging operations and when oil / ammonia is being drained from the system. They are prohibiting Hot Work operations during these operations to remove potential ignition sources.

 

The Control(s)

You can make a (weak) case that simply referencing the RAGAGEP and inserting a single line in your Hot Work policy address the compliance requirement, but we’re going to need to do a lot more to make this prohibition a “real” thing in our actual operations.

 

Control Group #1: The Hot Work element

In the element Written Plan, we added two new “call-out’s” in the two places they are likely to be seen when planning Hot Work policies. First, in the section on Conducting Hot Work:

 

Second, in the section on Sulphur Stick use:

 

Third, in the Hot Work Permit itself, we modified the existing question on flammable atmospheres:

 

Control Group #2: The Operating & MI Procedures

All procedures that involve oil draining, ammonia charging and ammonia purging already point to the LEO (Line & Equipment Opening a.k.a. Line Break) written procedure. This makes our job a bit easier here, since we only have to modify our LEO rather than the dozens of procedures that might include this type of work.

We modified the traditional LEO “General Precautions section to place a check for Hot Work during an existing requirement to canvas the area for personnel that may be affected by the LEO:

 

In the more advanced, two-step “Pre-Plan and Permit” version of our LEO, we modified the “Pre-Plan Template” to include a warning:

 

In both versions of the LEO permit itself, we added an explicit check:

 

Closing Thoughts

This one small RAGAGEP change points to a single hazard – a hazard that we’re now trying to control in six different ways. Notice that we’ve made all these changes so they are popping up throughout the program:

  • In preparing policies for the associated work;
  • In the course of preparing for the work itself;
  • In the course of conducting the potentially hazardous operations.

This is critical because if we want to get the best “bang for our buck” in Process Safety, the safety portion has to be integrated into our actual processes on multiple levels.

Obviously, we’ll have to train on these changes to ensure that they’ll be effective. It’s quite possible that, after implementation, we’ll identify additional ways to prevent the hazard from being realized and will need to make further changes.

Two IIAR Standards announced for Public Review

IIAR has just announced that two standard’s revisions are available for public review and comment: IIAR 6 & IIAR 7.

IIAR 6 is a new standard. In our opinion, it is going to be the largest change to NH3 Refrigeration practices since the advent of the PSM/RMP rules. Among other things, it is meant to replace IIAR Bulletin 109 (IIAR Minimum Safety Criteria for a Safe Ammonia Refrigeration System) and IIAR Bulletin 110 (Guidelines for: Start-Up, Inspection and Maintenance of Ammonia Mechanical Refrigerating Systems)

Here is some info from the IIAR:

IIAR 6 (Maintenance) Public Review #2

A second (2nd) public review of draft standard BSR/IIAR 6-201x, Standard for Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of Closed-Circuit Ammonia Refrigeration Systems is now open. The International Institute of Ammonia Refrigeration (IIAR) invites you to make comments on the draft standard. Substantive changes resulting from this public review will also be provided for comment in a future public review if necessary.

BSR/IIAR 6-201x, specifies the minimum requirements for inspection, testing, and maintenance applicable to stationary closed-circuit ammonia refrigeration systems. It presupposes that the persons who use the document have a working knowledge of the functionality of ammonia refrigeration system(s) and basic ammonia refrigeration practices and principles. This standard is intended for those who inspect, test, and maintain stationary closed-circuit ammonia refrigeration systems. This standard shall apply only to stationary closed-circuit refrigeration systems utilizing ammonia as the refrigerant. It supplements existing general refrigeration standards issued by IIAR and other organizations such as ASHRAE, ASME, and ANSI. It is not intended to supplant existing safety codes (e.g., model mechanical or fire codes).

IIAR has designated the draft standard as BSR/IIAR 6-201x. Upon approval by the ANSI Board of Standards Review, the standard will receive a different name that reflects this approval date.

We invite you to participate in the second (2nd) public review of BSR/IIAR 6-201x. IIAR will use the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) procedures to develop evidence of consensus among affected parties. ANSI’s role in the revision process is to establish and enforce standards of openness, balance, due process and harmonization with other American and International Standards. IIAR is the ANSI-accredited standards developer for BSR/IIAR 6-201x and is responsible for the technical content of the standard.

This site includes links to the following attachments:

The 45-day public review period will be from March 2nd, 2018 through April 16th, 2018. Comments are due no later than 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time (EST) on April 16th, 2018.

Note: The changes in IIAR 6 PR2 are fairly large and will require you to review your MI program for compliance.

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IIAR 7 has been around for a while. Early last year we made some significant changes to our templates to be compliant with its unique requirements.

IIAR 7 (Operating Procedures) Public Review #2

A second (2nd) public review of draft standard BSR/IIAR 7-201x, Developing Operating Procedures for Closed-Circuit Ammonia Refrigeration Systems is now open which presents substantive changes only that were received and approved during the standard’s first (1st) public review and comment response resolutions. The International Institute of Ammonia Refrigeration (IIAR) invites you to make comments on the draft standard. Substantive changes resulting from this public review will also be provided for comment in a future public review if necessary.

BSR/IIAR 7-201x, defines the minimum requirements for developing operating procedures applicable to closed-circuit ammonia refrigeration systems. It presupposes that the persons who use the document have a working knowledge of the functionality of an ammonia refrigeration system(s) and basic ammonia refrigeration practices and principles. This standard is intended for those who develop, define, or review operating procedures, or a combination thereof, for closed-circuit ammonia refrigeration systems. This standard shall apply only to stationary closed-circuit refrigeration systems utilizing ammonia as the refrigerant. It supplements existing general refrigeration standards issued by IIAR and other organizations such as ASHRAE, ASME, and ANSI. It is not intended to supplant existing safety codes (e.g., model mechanical or fire codes).

IIAR has designated the draft standard as BSR/IIAR 7-201x. Upon approval by the ANSI Board of Standards Review, the standard will receive a different name that reflects this approval date.

We invite you to participate in the second (2nd) public review of BSR/IIAR 7-201x. IIAR will use the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) procedures to develop evidence of consensus among affected parties. ANSI’s role in the revision process is to establish and enforce standards of openness, balance, due process, and harmonization with other American and International Standards. IIAR is the ANSI-accredited standards developer for BSR/IIAR 7-201x and is responsible for the technical content of the standard.

This site includes links to the following attachments:

The 30-day public review period will be from March 2nd, 2018 through April 1st, 2018. Comments are due no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) on April 1st, 2018.

Note: The changes in IIAR 7 PR2 are fairly minor and are unlikely to substantially affect your SOPs if you are already compliant with IIAR 7-2013.

IIAR 7 update now open for Public Review

November 10th, 2017
To: IIAR Members
Re: First (1st) Public Review of Standard BSR/IIAR 7-201x, Developing Operating Procedures for Closed-Circuit Ammonia Refrigeration Systems.
A first (1st) public review of draft standard BSR/IIAR 7-201x, Developing Operating Procedures for Closed-Circuit Ammonia Refrigeration Systems is now open. The International Institute of Ammonia Refrigeration (IIAR) invites you to make comments on the draft standard. Substantive changes resulting from this public review will also be provided for comment in a future public review if necessary.

BSR/IIAR 7-201x, defines the minimum requirements for developing operating procedures applicable to closed-circuit ammonia refrigeration systems. It presupposes that the persons who use the document have a working knowledge of the functionality of an ammonia refrigeration system(s) and basic ammonia refrigeration practices and principles. This standard is intended for those who develop, define, or review operating procedures, or a combination thereof, for closed-circuit ammonia refrigeration systems. This standard shall apply only to stationary closed-circuit refrigeration systems utilizing ammonia as the refrigerant. It supplements existing general refrigeration standards issued by IIAR and other organizations such as ASHRAE, ASME, and ANSI. It is not intended to supplant existing safety codes (e.g., model mechanical or fire codes).

IIAR has designated the draft standard as BSR/IIAR 7-201x. Upon approval by the ANSI Board of Standards Review, the standard will receive a different name that reflects this approval date.

We invite you to participate in the first (1st) public review of BSR/IIAR 7-201x. IIAR will use the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) procedures to develop evidence of consensus among affected parties. ANSI’s role in the revision process is to establish and enforce standards of openness, balance, due process, and harmonization with other American and International Standards. IIAR is the ANSI-accredited standards developer for BSR/IIAR 7-201x, and is responsible for the technical content of the standard.

This site includes links to the following attachments:

The 45-day public review period will be from November 10th, 2017 through December 26th, 2017. Comments are due no later than 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time (EST) on December 26th, 2017.

A quick review of the update shows no significant changes are necessary to the current stock templates.

2017 SOP Template Updates

The SOP reference element guideline and RESOP/ROSOP reference  templates have been updated for 2017. The changes are basically broken into two groups: Continuous Improvement and IIAR 7.

Continuous Improvement: As always, there are a lot of little change suggestions that have been built up over time that were expressed in different templates in slightly different ways. Here are some of the change highlights in this section:

  • Section breaks are all now 3pt and merged into a single cell.
  • Stray CG Times font text changed to the default Book Antiqua that is used everywhere else.
  • All RESOPs (and Appropriate ROSOPs) follow this section order:
    1. Normal Startup
    2. Monitor Normal Operations
    3. Emergency Operations
    4. Emergency Shutdown
    5. Manual Shutdown and Isolation
    6. Maintenance Procedure(s) such as Oil Draining and schedules MI tasks.
  • Startup steps were re-organized and harmonized between equipment types.
  • HOA/LOTO steps made more explicit and consistent.
  • Emergency Shutdown section easier to follow and harmonized between equipment types.
  • Added text referencing the Incident Investigation element in the Emergency Shutdown section.
  • Shutdown section now starts with an option to just STOP the unit using the control computer/panel and then provides steps to Isolate and pump it down.
  • Harmonized Operating Limits, Consequences of Deviation and Steps Required to Correct or Avoid Deviation between equipment types. These sections were also harmonized with consistent BOLDing of the relevant variable between the sections as appropriate.

IIAR 7: I have long bypassed IIAR 7 “Developing Operating Procedures for Closed-Circuit Ammonia Mechanical Refrigerating Systems,” preferring to use the CCPS “Guidelines for Writing Effective Operating and Maintenance Procedures.” While my reference templates still use the CCPS as their basis, I felt it necessary to perform a Gap-Analysis between the templates I’ve been using (and continuously improving) for over a decade and the requirements in IIAR 7-2013. This is especially important because the International Machine Code (IMC) has been updated to point to IIAR 2-2014 (Safe Design of Closed-Circuit Ammonia Refrigeration Systems) which references IIAR 7-2013. While I am still not calling IIAR7 RAGAGEP in my PSM programs, I wanted to ensure that the PSM program SOP(s) were compliant with it. While there were no significant changes necessary to make the templates more compliant with IIAR 7, some changes were necessary. Here’s what changes were required for IIAR 7 compliance:

  • Explicit reference to control alarms during Start-up
  • Updated checks during Normal Operations to ensure coverage of all the items listed in IIAR 7
  • Include Supervisory Notification during Shutdowns

For those of you who use these reference templates, they are available in the Google Share in a directory called “IIAR 7 Mods.” After a few months of trials and minor revisions, these templates will replace the existing templates in the main directory. The old templates will be rendered obsolete and moved to the 0bsolete directory.

If you have existing SOPs using the 2016 (or earlier) versions of the template, you will want to compare the new templates with your existing implementation. Please note: These new templates will be the basis for ALL future template modifications / updates.

Below is a list of ALL the changes made to the SOP template section.

  • SOP Guidelines
    • Modified Implementation Policy: Operating Phases: Temporary Operation to include an explanation that a Temporary Operation SOP would require an MOC which would involve supervisory oversight due to the requirements of IIAR 7 6.2.3.1(a), 6.3.3.1(a), 6.5.3.1(a), 6.6.3.1(a), 6.7.3.1(a) & 6.8.3.1(a).
  • Compressor RESOP Template
    • Re-ordered startup steps to optimize efficiency
    • Added explicit reference to control alarms during Start-up due to the requirements of IIAR 7 6.2.1.1(g)
    • Modified Monitor Normal Operations sections to include explicit checks for all appropriate items in section of IIAR 7 6.2.2.1
    • Optimized HOA / LOTO call-out Made more explicit LOTO call-outs in the Manual Shutdown section.
    • Optimized lead-in language to Manual Shutdown section and closure of Emergency Shutdown section to include Supervisory notification required under of IIAR 7 6.2.4 & 6.2.5.1. Manual Shutdown now starts with an option to just STOP the unit and then offers steps to pump it down.
    • Optimized Emergency Shutdown section to make it easier to follow. Added an explicit requirement to notify supervisory personnel so they can evaluate the need for an Incident Investigation.
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
    • Updated Emergency Operations & Equipment Information section to standardize use of capitalization and bold text.
  • Condenser RESOP Template
    • Re-ordered startup steps to optimize efficiency
    • Added explicit reference to control alarms during Start-up due to the requirements of IIAR 7 6.3.1.1(g)
    • Modified Monitor Normal Operations sections to include explicit checks for all appropriate items in section of IIAR 7 6.3.2.1
    • Optimized HOA / LOTO call-out Made more explicit LOTO call-outs in the Manual Shutdown section.
    • Optimized lead-in language to Manual Shutdown section and closure of Emergency Shutdown section to include Supervisory notification required under of IIAR 7 6.3.4 & 6.3.5.1. Manual Shutdown now starts with an option to just STOP the unit and then offers steps to pump it down.
    • Optimized Emergency Shutdown section to make it easier to follow. Added an explicit requirement to notify supervisory personnel so they can evaluate the need for an Incident Investigation.
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
    • Updated Emergency Operations & Equipment Information section to standardize use of capitalization and bold text.
  • Air Unit RESOP Template
    • Re-ordered startup steps to optimize efficiency
    • Added explicit reference to control alarms during Start-up due to the requirements of IIAR 7 6.4.1.1(g)
    • Modified Monitor Normal Operations sections to include explicit checks for all appropriate items in section of IIAR 7 6.4.2.1
    • Optimized HOA / LOTO call-out Made more explicit LOTO call-outs in the Manual Shutdown section.
    • Optimized lead-in language to Manual Shutdown section and closure of Emergency Shutdown section to include Supervisory notification required under of IIAR 7 6.4.4 & 6.4.5.1. Manual Shutdown now starts with an option to just STOP the unit and then offers steps to pump it down.
    • Optimized Emergency Shutdown section to make it easier to follow. Added an explicit requirement to notify supervisory personnel so they can evaluate the need for an Incident Investigation.
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
    • Updated Emergency Operations & Equipment Information section to standardize use of capitalization and bold text.
  • Vessel RESOP Template
    • Re-ordered startup steps to optimize efficiency
    • Added explicit reference to control alarms during Start-up due to the requirements of IIAR 7 6.5.1.1(g)
    • Modified Monitor Normal Operations sections to include explicit checks for all appropriate items in section of IIAR 7 6.5.2.1
    • Optimized HOA / LOTO call-out Made more explicit LOTO call-outs in the Manual Shutdown section.
    • Optimized lead-in language to Manual Shutdown section and closure of Emergency Shutdown section to include Supervisory notification required under of IIAR 7 6.5.4 & 6.5.5.1. Manual Shutdown now starts with an option to just STOP the unit and then offers steps to pump it down.
    • Optimized Emergency Shutdown section to make it easier to follow. Added an explicit requirement to notify supervisory personnel so they can evaluate the need for an Incident Investigation.
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
    • Updated Emergency Operations & Equipment Information section to standardize use of capitalization and bold text.
  • Recirculating Vessel RESOP Template
    • Re-ordered startup steps to optimize efficiency
    • Added explicit reference to control alarms during Start-up due to the requirements of IIAR 7 6.5.1.1(g)
    • Modified Monitor Normal Operations sections to include explicit checks for all appropriate items in section of IIAR 7 6.5.2.1
    • Optimized HOA / LOTO call-out Made more explicit LOTO call-outs in the Manual Shutdown section.
    • Optimized lead-in language to Manual Shutdown section and closure of Emergency Shutdown section to include Supervisory notification required under of IIAR 7 6.5.4 & 6.5.5.1. Manual Shutdown now starts with an option to just STOP the unit and then offers steps to pump it down.
    • Optimized Emergency Shutdown section to make it easier to follow. Added an explicit requirement to notify supervisory personnel so they can evaluate the need for an Incident Investigation.
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
    • Updated Emergency Operations & Equipment Information section to standardize use of capitalization and bold text.
    • Added reminder about documenting oil drained during the oil draining procedural section.
  • Heat Exchanger RESOP Template
    • Re-ordered startup steps to optimize efficiency
    • Added explicit reference to control alarms during Start-up due to the requirements of IIAR 7 6.4.1.1(g)
    • Modified Monitor Normal Operations sections to include explicit checks for all appropriate items in section of IIAR 7 6.4.2.1
    • Optimized HOA / LOTO call-out Made more explicit LOTO call-outs in the Manual Shutdown section.
    • Optimized lead-in language to Manual Shutdown section and closure of Emergency Shutdown section to include Supervisory notification required under of IIAR 7 6.4.4 & 6.4.5.1. Manual Shutdown now starts with an option to just STOP the unit and then offers steps to pump it down.
    • Optimized Emergency Shutdown section to make it easier to follow. Added an explicit requirement to notify supervisory personnel so they can evaluate the need for an Incident Investigation.
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
    • Updated Emergency Operations & Equipment Information section to standardize use of capitalization and bold text.
  • Autopurger RESOP Template(s)
    • Re-ordered startup steps to optimize efficiency
    • Added explicit reference to control alarms during Start-up due to the requirements of IIAR 7 6.4.1.1(g)
    • Modified Monitor Normal Operations sections to include explicit checks for all appropriate items in section of IIAR 7 6.4.2.1
    • Optimized HOA / LOTO call-out Made more explicit LOTO call-outs in the Manual Shutdown section.
    • Optimized lead-in language to Manual Shutdown section and closure of Emergency Shutdown section to include Supervisory notification required under of IIAR 7 6.4.4 & 6.4.5.1. Manual Shutdown now starts with an option to just STOP the unit and then offers steps to pump it down.
    • Optimized Emergency Shutdown section to make it easier to follow. Added an explicit requirement to notify supervisory personnel so they can evaluate the need for an Incident Investigation.
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
    • Updated Emergency Operations & Equipment Information section to standardize use of capitalization and bold text.
  • Overall System Operation ROSOP 101 Template
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
  • NH3Vent ROSOP Template
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
    • Updated Emergency Operations & Equipment Information section to standardize use of capitalization and bold text. A nearly complete rewrite of the section as well.
  • Car-Seal ROSOP Template
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
  • Line Opening (LEO) ROSOP Template
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
    • Removed – Non-Permit version of the ROSOP. Still available in 0bsolete archive.
  • Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) ROSOP Template
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) ROSOP Template
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.
  • Quality Assurance (QA) ROSOP Template
    • Updated the Safety & Health section to use more of the IIAR example wording.

Yes, there are a LOT of changes! If you want any assistance or clarification on any of these changes, feel free to contact me.